Delta Flight 1251 Returns to Atlanta with Engine Trouble

Delta Airlines Boeing 757

Delta Airlines Boeing 757

A Delta jet en route to Orange County returned to Atlanta after blowing an engine before takeoff on Friday afternoon.

Delta Flight 1251, a Boeing 757-200 aircraft, reportedly had an engine failure…the exact type is not known.

The flight landed safely at ATL and there were no injuries reported.

Comments

    • John says

      They were past their V1 speed on the runway which meant they were committed to fly. There was not enough runway left to make a safe stop. At V1 you are committed.

      • Cheri says

        Agree…I was on this flight on the wing and had a visual of the flaming engine, but knew they were committed to take off. I heard a loud pop immediately upon take off, but as we were lifting there did not appear to be enough engine power…speed. We were also swerving on the runway prior to lift off.

        We appeared to rise above 10k feet or higher, and were still climbing. I checked with the passenger in the window seat, as I was on the aisle, and he said the flame is still burning, flashing…after some time passed, i yelled FIRE in an attempt to alert a flight attendant since they can not hear the attendant button during take off, nor can they communicate with the cockpit at that time. She ran back, saw flaming engine, grabbed another pilot from the cabin on our flight and pulled him into the cockpit. Since the fuel tanks are on the wings, and i later learned that passengers 4 rows ahead of me also saw flames moving toward the front of the wing, we could hve had a different outcome.They then turned around and landed. She said that was actually good that I spoke up so that she could take action, even though the pilot knew of the issue. He got us on the ground safely, and we were very grateful.

        In Atlanta, there was no Delta liaison available, or phone number given to provide feedback. I spoke with an employee at the next gate, since passengers were grateful, but some felt insulted by the gesture of a $50 voucher that never materialized in Orange County..poor PR Delta…it would have been best to pass on that, in my opinion. I know they are on the most admired company list for 2013, and will fly Delta in the future. I was glad that we kept the same pilot and crew as we boarded another aircraft.

        Surprised that there has been no mention of this until I saw this site.

    • William says

      Ok we’ll then this article needs to be fixed because it says it happened before takeoff which means in my eyes before getting on the runway not during takeoff.

        • William says

          I am using my brain but most times when you see before take off its before the runway and not During the takeoff roll which is the same as during takeoff. I do know what before and during take off means as we’ll as I am a 747-400 pilot I have been flying 30+ years

          • Sam says

            You may have been a 744 pilot but I hope your flying skills were better than your proofreading skills.

            • William says

              This is the last comment I’m placing in here because none of you see what I’m saying. If your at v1 or rolling down the runway and you blow a engine it happens during ur takeoff roll not before takeoff. This article states that the plane blew a engine before there takeoff not during or after there take off roll. Now on that note my comments are mine. You don’t have to like them but please just be respectful.

              • Cheri says

                I understand what you are saying, since the article does say before in error…so, agree that they should make a correction.

    • Travelbud says

      I was on this flight last year and had a front row view of the entire incident. The loud pop and flames happened before we actually rotated. I too knew that we were going to fast to abort takeoff. There were flames coming out the back of the left engine, big flames. The plane continued its takeoff and we rotated. I did not notice any lack of power or unusual swerving. We must have climbed to about 1500-2000 feet and looped back around to land. The flames eventually went out as we were flying and when we safely landed we stopped in the middle of the runway to have emergency vehicles have a look and determine if it was safe enough to taxi back to the gate. I was with my husband who had just graduated that day from Delta’s flight attendant training program. During the ordeal he stood up and told everyone to remain calm and people actually settled down. What a way to break into the business.

  1. Warren says

    I was on the flight sitting in the exit row…I heard some passengers managed to take pictures of the fire. Does anyone know where those are? I didn’t even think of taking a picture.

    Either way, I’m glad we all made it back safe. As a PM with Delta for 5+ years, I’m disappointed with the way customer service handled the situation once back on the ground. I hate hearing that we’ll be on the next flight in 15 minutes, yet it’s 15 more minutes each half hour. The voucher program wasn’t explained well and if I hadn’t gone through the process before, I’d be a little confused.

    Go to delta.com/redeem and plug in your info. It should activate the $50 travel voucher.

  2. Warren says

    I was on the flight sitting in the exit row…I heard some passengers managed to take pictures of the fire. Does anyone know where those are? I didn’t even think of taking a picture. Either way, I’m glad we all made it back safe. As a PM with Delta for 5+ years, I’m disappointed with the way customer service handled the situation once back on the ground. I hate hearing that we’ll be on the next flight in 15 minutes, yet it’s 15 more minutes each half hour. The voucher program wasn’t explained well and if I hadn’t gone through the process before, I’d be a little confused. Go to delta.com/redeem and plug in your info. It should activate the $50 travel voucher.

  3. FC Passenger says

    I was on this flight, in the F/C Cabin, and I experienced a different view of the events. During the take off and slightly prior to V2, there was a large boom and floor board vibration near the 1st or 2nd row of seats, which gave me the impression that the aircraft blew a tire on the nose gear. Directly following the boom, the aircraft seemed to have vibration and steering issues from the nose gear. The pilot immediately put the aircraft in the air and then shortly thereafter we heard people yelling fire and the flight crew went immediately back to investigate. We then heard from one person in the back of the aircraft that the engine was on fire. That information was relayed to the captain and he continued to fly the aircraft straight, I assume to cut fuel to the engine and activate the fire suppression system on the #1 engine. After several minutes of flying, he announced an emergency landing and circled the airport and landed. When he landed he came in low and when his main gears touched downed, he kept the aircraft on the main gears longer than normal and eased the aircraft down on to the nose gear and we immediately had vibration and some steering issues. Based on my recount of these events, I believe he blew one of the tires on the nose gear, probably the left tire, and some debris from the tire was sucked into the #1 Engine causing the fire and engine failure. Just my opinion.

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